Last Updated: 9/20/19 | September 20th, 2019

Known as “La Isla de la Muñecas” in Spanish, the “Island of the Dolls” is perhaps one of the creepiest tourist attractions in the world. You half expect Chucky to come out and slash you. It reminds me of those horror movies like The Hills Have Eyes, where someone searches inside the house and it looks like no one has been there for years and there are lots of ruined dolls on the floor. Yes, this is a creepy place filled with superstition.

The story of this place begins when a hermit named Don Julian Santana moved here. For some unknown reason, he had left his wife and decided to spend the last 50 years of his life living alone. I suspect it’s because his wife had kept stealing the covers while they were sleeping.

The “haunted” aspect of this story begins when supposedly three girls once visited here. While playing in the water, one of the girls drowned. As a result, her restless spirit haunted the island. Julian initially put up one doll to ward off this paranormal menace and help put the girl’s soul to rest so she could pass on to the next life. However, the “activity” of the ghost only increased, and more and more dolls were placed in the trees in an attempt to appease the girl’s spirit. The only time Julian left the island was to get more dolls. He even used to trade food for dolls. It is also said that each doll holds a portion of the girl’s spirit.

Sadly, Don Julian Santana was found dead in 2001 by his nephew, in the same canal where he said the little girl drowned! (Freaky, huh?) The island was on the Syfy Channel show Destination Truth, where a paranormal investigation team spent the night. They apparently saw apparitions and heard voices.

This is a strange tourist attraction. Many visitors are overwhelmed by the childish, dead faces of dolls that appear to haunt this place. It’s as though they are following you as you wander around, checking you out. It is as though they are what haunts this island, not the spirit of the little girl.

This super eerie tourist attraction is located south of Mexico City. It’s on private property, but the nephew now runs tours there, so it’s easy to get to. Simply ask your hotel or hostel to point you in the right direction. If you go to the Xochimilco canal, take a trajinera from the Cuemanco Pier to the island.

 

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Central America
27.04.2011 / mexico
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